PlayStation 5: All the known details regarding Sony’s next console, arriving in 2020

By Aaron Potter | | 5893 |

Holiday 2020 is shaping up to be quite an exciting time for the future of video games, not only treating us to the release of one brand new home console but two. However, as the runaway success during the current console generation, all eyes are on Sony in terms of what they can offer players with the launch of PlayStation 5.

Details have slowly been trickling out as to what PlayStation 4’s successor will look and play like, making this the perfect time to round up all the known information. The PS5 recently had its official reveal which gave us proper eyes on the console’s design, and it’d be fair to say that the form factor is a lot more future than what most people were expecting. From games to design to functionality, here’s everything we know about PlayStation 5.

PlayStation 5: Release Date

For all the important details we still don’t know regarding PlayStation 5, one thing is for certain: it’s coming some time in Holiday 2020. This makes a lot of sense when you consider that previous consoles have made a habit of launching in November, as with PlayStation 3 and PlayStation 4, so why break with established tradition? No hard date is yet known but expect it to be any time between October and December.

PlayStation 5: Where to buy

While there’s still no official release date for the PlayStation 5 announced yet, prospective purchasers should expect a wide range of familiar UK retailers to secure stock. We know this because many stores have already started to offer people ways of registering their interest, the most prominent example being tech-focused giant Currys PC World and Amazon UK. It’s here where you can register your interest and stay up to date.

Still, as is usually the case whenever a new video game console releases, other stores likely to sell PS5 units include GAME, Smyths Toy Store, Very and others. We’ll be sure to let you know when PlayStation 5 pre-orders officially go live – it has to be any day now considering both this and the Xbox Series X are predicted to be out by November. Simply put, it’s time to start saving.

PlayStation 5: Specs

When it comes to the hardware PlayStation 5 will be packing under the hood, Sony has stated that two key words relate to the future of the platform: ‘immersive’ and ‘seamless’. It’s expected that a lot of this will be achieved through substantially better graphic rendering speeds, a custom broadband SSD and just generally improved oomph when it comes to computational power. We know that the PS5 will be boasting a bespoke 8-core chipset developed by AMD, which, when combined with full 8K support should see the console capable of such visual flourishes as ray tracing, HDR support and much more.

The introduction of an SSD (solid state drive) could prove to be key, allowing developers to reduce the install size of next-generation games while still maintaining a high level of graphical fidelity. Knowing this information, analysts estimate that the PlayStation 5’s new PS5 will be 19 times faster than current storage methods, meaning that this data can be output without any noticeable delay. Simply put, PlayStation 5 will be a marked step up in terms of how games will look, yes, but these clever data management improvements suggest that games should install and boot up a lot faster.

Specs PlayStation 5
Price TBA
Release Date Holiday 2020
Processor Custom 8-core AMD
RAM 16GB GDDR6/256-bit
Teraflops 9 TF
Storage Custom 825gb SSD
Backwards Compatible Top 100 PS4 games only (at launch)
Ray Tracing Yes
Max resolution 8K
Max framerate 120 frames per second

PlayStation 5: Design

One of the biggest surprises about the PS5’s design is that it would be launching with White as its default colour rather than PlayStation’s traditional black. This is the first white launch console we’ve seen since 2007’s Wii, marking a significant decision by Sony to have the console stand out on the store shelf. Such an unconventional aesthetic means that there will be no confusion between PlayStation 5 and its Xbox Series X, which looks more like a standard black box.

Other notable aspects about the design is in how there will be two versions: a standard PS5 and a PS5 Digital Edition. The latter of which is clearly intended at those who prefer buying games digitally, whereas the vanilla PS5 caters to players that enjoy the freedom of purchasing games as a disc. This big difference does affect the console’s appearance, with the digital edition boasting a slimmer and more symmetrical look compared to its disc drive-equipped variant. For the first time PlayStation purchasers have a choice of two designs at launch.

PlayStation 5: Controller

We might not know what the PlayStation 5 console itself will look like from a design standpoint, but there is far more details known about the PS5 controller, oddly. Following a swathe of product patent leaks and even a devkit photograph, Sony finally revealed the look of the PS5 controller – known officially as The DualSense – on April 7th, 2020. Alongside its evolved, futuristic-looking aesthetic, the DualSense PS5 controller packs in a bunch of new features. Most of these range from simple things like a USB-C connection all the way up to a built-in microphone that offsets the need to use a headset. Chief amongst them, however, is an emphasis on touch and haptic feedback.

The DualSense has been designed with ergonomics and realistic gameplay feel in mind, most notably seen in the inclusion of haptic triggers that Sony boasts will let players “truly feel the tension of your actions, like when drawing a bow to shoot an arrow”. The “Share” button has been replaced with a new “Create” button, yet again pioneering the ease with which players can make their own mark in a game. Another small detail is in how the analogue sticks remain parallel, but no longer protrude down from the bottom. Overall, it’s a different direction for the lineage of PlayStation controllers, but definitely a bold one. Here’s hoping it pays off.

PlayStation 5: Confirmed Games

Speaking of which, there isn’t too much information regarding PlayStation 5 launch titles. However, one publisher has outright states that a whole bunch of its games will be coming to next generation consoles, in Ubisoft. This means that games such as Watch Dogs: Legion, Ghost Recon: Quarantine and Gods and Monsters will all be playable on PS5, some time in the near future if not at launch alongside Sony’s new console. Other publishers are sure to support PS5, but here’s a list of the confirmed games so far:

  • Watch Dogs: Legion
  • Gods and Monsters
  • Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Quarantine
  • Godfall
  • Outriders
  • The Lord of the Rings: Gollum
  • Gothic
  • Assassin’s Creed Valhalla
  • Dirt 5
  • Chorus
  • Vampire: The Masquerade – Bloodlines 2
  • Scarlet Nexus

PlayStation 5: Price

Sony famously exclaimed that gamers would be willing to “get a second job” to buy their new console back in the PlayStation 3 era. Fast forward over 10 years, however, and the minds behind the leading console platform have thankfully become a lot humbler. The PS4 originally launched day one here in the UK for £349, but with PlayStation 5 packing much more power and wider capabilities, it’s safe to assume that it won’t quite be able to match this price again.

However, Sony needs to be careful not to price out their target audience entirely, so we’d be shocked if PlayStation 5’s initial day one price creeped up to beyond the £450 mark. We know this won’t be ideal for a lot of general PlayStation fans, but for those who simply must have the newest, latest and best as fast as possible, it’s certainly doable. Still, this is all just speculation at this point. Here’s hoping PS5 will cost a reasonable amount when it launches in Holiday 2020.

PlayStation 5: Additional features

In terms of other cool stuff that’ll arrive hand-in-hand with PlayStation 5’s launch, there’s a couple of titbits that have been confirmed. For one, Sony has already confirmed that they’ll continue to support VR ventures on its new platform, with existing PlayStation VR headsets fully compatible with PS5. This then in turn means that PSVR’s external accessories like the PS4 camera and PS Move controllers will also be supported, meaning that those with a PSVR headset – or are looking to buy one – can have full confidence that this aspect of gaming will work on PS5.

Another cool additional feature unlike anything seen with PS4 is the inclusion of haptic feedback in the impending Dualshock 5 controller. This will replace the PS4 gamepad’s rumble technology to deliver a gameplay feel that’s much more realistic than simple vibration. With haptic feedback, every pull of the trigger or swing of the rope helps bring you closer to the game, providing PS5 game developers execute it accurately. In an interview with PlayStation’s Jim Ryan he commented, “Even just playing the racing game Gran Turismo Sport with a PlayStation 5 controller is a completely different experience. While it runs well with the previous controller, there is no going back after you experience the detailed road surface via haptic control.”

Finally, Sony has now confirmed that backwards compatibility will be a feature in PlayStation 5, but only with a limited library at launch. As stated in the “Roads to PS5” GDC livestream on March 18th, at launch PS5 will be compatible with the top 100 most popular PS4 games, but there are currently no plans to add PS3 or PS3. This will be a little disappointing to some, but at least ensures early PS5 adopters will have some kind of game collection to pull from at launch.